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Posts by Zachary Eddington

Zachary Eddington is a student at Harvard Law School, where he is an editor of the Harvard Law Review. He previously worked as an analyst at the Department of Defense and interned at the U.N. International Law Commission, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Middle East Institute. He graduated with a B.S. in international politics from Georgetown University in 2009.

Executive Order Authorizes South Sudan Sanctions

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Sunday, April 6, 2014 at 2:00 PM

On Thursday, President Obama signed an executive order authorizing the Department of the Treasury to impose sanctions on certain individuals and entities involved in the conflict in South Sudan. The order has two main components. First, it specifies the persons that the government can designate for sanctions. It doesn’t name particular individuals and entities; instead, . . .
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Overview of Restrictions on Counsel in the Tsarnaev and 9/11 Cases

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Monday, December 2, 2013 at 3:00 PM

From the defense’s standpoint, which are more onerous: restrictions on lawyers in civilian terrorism cases or restrictions used in military commissions? Accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is currently challenging Special Administrative Measures (SAMs) imposed on him and his attorneys; Judge George O’Toole of the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts heard argument on . . .
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Tsarnaev Files Reply in Support of Motion to Vacate Special Administrative Measures

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Friday, November 8, 2013 at 11:00 AM

On Monday, accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev filed his reply to the government’s response to his motion to vacate special administrative measures (SAMs) imposed on him and his attorneys. In his filing, Tsarnaev rejects the government’s claim that the court lacks jurisdiction to consider his motion, and he reiterates that the measures are not properly authorized and violate the Constitution. Tsarnaev opens . . .
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Government Files Response to Tsarnaev’s Motion to Vacate Special Administrative Measures

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Wednesday, October 30, 2013 at 7:00 AM

Last Monday, the government filed its response to accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s motion to vacate the special administrative measures (SAMs) imposed on him and his attorneys. (We previously described the measures and Tsarnaev’s challenge here.) In essence, the opposition filing makes two arguments: first, that the court lacks jurisdiction to consider Tsarnaev’s motion because he failed to exhaust his . . .
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Tsarnaev Files Motion to Vacate Special Administrative Measures

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Monday, October 7, 2013 at 8:00 AM

Last Wednesday, accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev filed a motion to vacate special administrative measures (SAMs) imposed on him and his attorneys. In his motion, Tsarnaev argues that the government has not alleged facts sufficient to justify the measures—essentially a package of additional security restrictions—and that the measures violate the First, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. Lawfare will cover the defense challenge, . . .
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E.D.N.Y. Grants Motion to Dismiss in Main Street Legal Services, Inc. v. National Security Council

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Sunday, August 11, 2013 at 7:32 PM

Last Tuesday, Judge Vitaliano of the Eastern District of New York dismissed a FOIA suit seeking access to NSC records about the drone program. Ritika already noted the court’s order in the news roundup; this post provides an overview of the opinion itself. In November 2012, Main Street Legal Services, a City University of New . . .
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Context for Judicial Oversight of the Targeted Killing Program: A Brief History of the Creation of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court

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Thursday, February 14, 2013 at 7:41 AM

Recent events have accelerated a discussion focused around creating a special court to oversee the execution of targeted killings against suspected terrorists. Some Lawfare contributors have weighed in on the idea (see here for Steve’s argument against such a court, here for Jack’s views in comparison with those of the ACLU, and here for Bobby’s . . .
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Turkish Leftist Group Likely Responsible for Attack on U.S. Embassy in Ankara

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Sunday, February 3, 2013 at 1:20 PM

Within hours of Friday’s suicide bombing, which killed one Turkish security guard, Turkish authorities had blamed the attack on a Turkish leftist group known as the Revolutionary People’s Liberation Party-Front (DHKP/C), an illegal Marxist organization established in the 1970s. Further information this weekend has confirmed those initial suspicions. Yesterday, the DHKP/C issued a statement claiming . . .
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Update on the Bradley Manning Case

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Monday, January 14, 2013 at 8:06 AM

Last week saw several new developments in the Bradley Manning case. Prosecutors announced on Wednesday that they intend to offer evidence that Osama bin Laden received some of the classified information that Manning allegedly provided to WikiLeaks. The government, relying in part on a Civil War precedent, plans to use the evidence to support a . . .
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Update on the FISA Amendments Act Reauthorization

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012 at 6:23 PM

The Supreme Court is not the only branch of government focused on FISA. As many Lawfare readers will recall, Congress is currently considering reauthorizing Title VII of FISA, which is scheduled to expire at the end of the year pursuant to a sunset provision in the 2008 amendments. This post summarizes the current status of . . .
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