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Posts by Paul Rosenzweig

Paul Rosenzweig is the founder of Red Branch Consulting PLLC, a homeland security consulting company and a Senior Advisor to The Chertoff Group. Mr. Rosenzweig formerly served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy in the Department of Homeland Security. He is a Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Homeland Security Studies and Analysis Institute. He also serves as a Professorial Lecturer in Law at George Washington University, a Senior Editor of the Journal of National Security Law & Policy, and as a Visiting Fellow at The Heritage Foundation.

The New White House Information Sharing Executive Order

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Wednesday, February 18, 2015 at 8:30 AM

Last Friday, as part of the Cybersecurity summit at Stanford, President Obama announced a new information sharing initiative, and issued an Executive Order that was tied to the initiative.  The EO will, in the end, do some modest good, but not nearly enough to really stem the tide.  Put prosaically, my best sense is that . . .
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Shutting Down DHS – A Realistic Appraisal

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Tuesday, February 17, 2015 at 12:43 PM

The press and the political junkies are all wrapped up in a discussion of the coming show down over the shut down of the Department of Homeland Security. The isn’t really about homeland security, of course – it’s about the President’s executive order extending enforcement discretion to many aliens who are present in the United . . .
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Searching the Dark Web

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Monday, February 9, 2015 at 11:15 AM

“By some estimates Google, Microsoft Bing, and Yahoo only give us access to around 5% of the content on the Web.” The Dark Web is vast and difficult to search — you have to know where you are going to get there.  Until now … Memex is a new, DARPA-funded search engine that allows law . . .
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The Internet of Things and Security — Process Not Standards

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Monday, February 9, 2015 at 10:25 AM

Earlier this year, Herb posted a nice summary of the FTC’s report on the security of the internet of things.  Today, Senator Ed Markey joins the conversation with a staff report on the insecurity of automobiles.  As the Post summarizes it, the Markey report says that: “Automakers are cramming cars with wireless technology, but they . . .
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Data Analytics and Policing

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Wednesday, February 4, 2015 at 9:25 AM

This interesting article on the NYPD’s use of data analytics came across my desk the other day.  Here is the abstract: The New York City Police Department’s Lower Manhattan Security Coordination Center integrates data from a variety of sources, including sensors (cameras, license plate readers, and environmental detectors) and records (arrests, complaints, summonses, 911 calls, . . .
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Bits and Bytes

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Wednesday, February 4, 2015 at 9:12 AM

What War in the Cyber Age Looks Like.  “To the young Syrian rebel fighter, the Skype message in early December 2013 appeared to come from a woman in Lebanon, named Iman Almasri, interested in his cause. Her picture, in a small icon alongside her name, showed a fair-skinned 20-something in a black head covering, wearing . . .
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Bits and Bytes

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Thursday, January 29, 2015 at 9:40 AM

You go off line for 3 days and so much worth noting happens!  Here are some recent developments: DHS Ooops.  Responding to a FOIA request regarding Operation Aurora (a Chinese attack on Google) DHS accidentally also releases classified data on Project Aurora (the first demonstration of SCADA vulnerabilities in the electric grid).  Our bad! Drone . . .
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An EU PNR System?

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Tuesday, January 20, 2015 at 10:11 AM

Passenger Name Records (or PNR) are the data collected by an airline at the time of a passenger’s reservation.  The data in a PNR is often very detailed and robust.  It may, for example, include a cell phone number for text updates or an email address.  It will typically also include an address, a credit . . .
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Bits and Bytes

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Sunday, January 18, 2015 at 10:27 AM

Hackers for Hire.  Hacker’s List is the new Uber for hacker hiring. “A man in Sweden says he will pay up to $2,000 to anyone who can break into his landlord’s website. A woman in California says she will pay $500 for someone to hack into her boyfriend’s Facebook and Gmail accounts to see if . . .
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The Administration’s Cyber Proposals — Information Sharing

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Friday, January 16, 2015 at 3:56 PM

As part of the run-up to the State of the Union address next week, the Administration has been releasing publicly some of its policy proposals.  One of the most notable suite of proposals involved new legislation relating to cybersecurity.  The transmittal letters and section-by-section analyses can be downloaded from the OMB website.  The White House . . .
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We Are Losing Money

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Thursday, January 15, 2015 at 9:37 AM

As part of our ongoing series on Bitcoin, I thought I would note today’s report that the value of Bitcoin has fallen below $200/XBT.  Since buying the coin on December 31 it has lost more than 33% of its value.  I sure am glad that Lawfare bought the coin, and not me personally.

What to Do About Ongwen?

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Wednesday, January 14, 2015 at 9:00 AM

The Washington Post has a fascinating article today about the legal issues arising from the surrender of one of the the notorious brutal leaders of the Lords Resistance Army, Dominic Ongwen.  Apparently he surrendered to Muslim rebels in the Central African Republic who, in turn, transferred custody of Ongwen to American forces on January 5.  . . .
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The CENTCOM Twitter Hack

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Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 5:33 PM

By now, most readers of this blog are well aware that, for a brief period of time yesterday, ISIS cyber warriors (going under the hashtag #CyberCaliphate) took control of the CENTCOM Twitter and You-Tube accounts.  Twitter and You-Tube are, of course, public facing PR sites, not operational ones, but still, the image is jarring. So, . . .
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Domain Name Control And Free Speech

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Saturday, January 10, 2015 at 9:51 AM

What does ICANN have to do with Charlie Hebdo?  Quite a bit, it turns out ….. Lawfare has been paying a fair bit of attention to the decision by the United States to give up its contractual control of the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA).  That authority is currently conducted by the Internet Corporation for . . .
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Lawfare Buys A Bitcoin—Buying the Coin

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Wednesday, January 7, 2015 at 11:04 AM

So . . .  you can’t explore bitcoins unless you actually have one in hand. If you don’t then, well, it’s really all pretty theoretical. We wanted to have some skin in the game, so to speak, so we decided we needed a bitcoin of our own.  For reasons that will become clear as we . . .
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Abolish West Point?

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Tuesday, January 6, 2015 at 2:50 PM

That’s the idea behind this article in Salon.  A different kind of lawfare, I guess.  Here’s the opening: Many pundits have suggested that the Republicans’ midterm gains were fueled by discontent not merely with the president or with the (improving) state of the economy, but with government in general and the need to fund its . . .
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The ICANN Transition of Internet Governance

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Tuesday, January 6, 2015 at 1:15 PM

I didn’t get a chance to post this over the weekend, but for those who are following the discussion over whether and how to transition control over the internet naming function to the international community, this editorial from the Washington Post suggests that there might be institutional caution growing.  Here is the opening: LAST MONTH, . . .
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The Interview — Ugh

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Friday, December 26, 2014 at 7:46 PM

Jane beat me to it …  This is a really bad movie.  The only thing worse than watching a bad movie out of a sense of patriotic obligation is doing so with the intent of writing a scathing review, only to find that most of your best analysis has already been written and published by . . .
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Christmas in the Trenches 2014

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Thursday, December 25, 2014 at 9:00 AM

This season makes me think of the story of the Christmas truce of 1914 in the trenches of the Western Front. With warm wishes to all of of Lawfare‘s readers and especial thanks to those of our readers who are serving overseas and are in harm’s way, here’s “Christmas in the Trenches,” by John McCutcheon:

Was It North Korea?

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Wednesday, December 24, 2014 at 12:44 PM

By now, we are all familiar with the attribution problems inherent in cyberspace.  Notwithstanding, I have been provisionally willing to accept the FBI’s assertion of North Korean responsibility for the Sony hack, if only because I assumed that it was premised on significant classified information to which we were not privy and that neither the . . .
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