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Posts by Paul Rosenzweig

Paul Rosenzweig is the founder of Red Branch Consulting PLLC, a homeland security consulting company and a Senior Advisor to The Chertoff Group. Mr. Rosenzweig formerly served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy in the Department of Homeland Security. He is a Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Homeland Security Studies and Analysis Institute. He also serves as a Professorial Lecturer in Law at George Washington University, a Senior Editor of the Journal of National Security Law & Policy, and as a Visiting Fellow at The Heritage Foundation.

An EU PNR System?

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Tuesday, January 20, 2015 at 10:11 AM

Passenger Name Records (or PNR) are the data collected by an airline at the time of a passenger’s reservation.  The data in a PNR is often very detailed and robust.  It may, for example, include a cell phone number for text updates or an email address.  It will typically also include an address, a credit . . .
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Bits and Bytes

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Sunday, January 18, 2015 at 10:27 AM

Hackers for Hire.  Hacker’s List is the new Uber for hacker hiring. “A man in Sweden says he will pay up to $2,000 to anyone who can break into his landlord’s website. A woman in California says she will pay $500 for someone to hack into her boyfriend’s Facebook and Gmail accounts to see if . . .
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The Administration’s Cyber Proposals — Information Sharing

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Friday, January 16, 2015 at 3:56 PM

As part of the run-up to the State of the Union address next week, the Administration has been releasing publicly some of its policy proposals.  One of the most notable suite of proposals involved new legislation relating to cybersecurity.  The transmittal letters and section-by-section analyses can be downloaded from the OMB website.  The White House . . .
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We Are Losing Money

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Thursday, January 15, 2015 at 9:37 AM

As part of our ongoing series on Bitcoin, I thought I would note today’s report that the value of Bitcoin has fallen below $200/XBT.  Since buying the coin on December 31 it has lost more than 33% of its value.  I sure am glad that Lawfare bought the coin, and not me personally.

What to Do About Ongwen?

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Wednesday, January 14, 2015 at 9:00 AM

The Washington Post has a fascinating article today about the legal issues arising from the surrender of one of the the notorious brutal leaders of the Lords Resistance Army, Dominic Ongwen.  Apparently he surrendered to Muslim rebels in the Central African Republic who, in turn, transferred custody of Ongwen to American forces on January 5.  . . .
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The CENTCOM Twitter Hack

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Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 5:33 PM

By now, most readers of this blog are well aware that, for a brief period of time yesterday, ISIS cyber warriors (going under the hashtag #CyberCaliphate) took control of the CENTCOM Twitter and You-Tube accounts.  Twitter and You-Tube are, of course, public facing PR sites, not operational ones, but still, the image is jarring. So, . . .
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Domain Name Control And Free Speech

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Saturday, January 10, 2015 at 9:51 AM

What does ICANN have to do with Charlie Hebdo?  Quite a bit, it turns out ….. Lawfare has been paying a fair bit of attention to the decision by the United States to give up its contractual control of the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA).  That authority is currently conducted by the Internet Corporation for . . .
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Lawfare Buys A Bitcoin—Buying the Coin

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Wednesday, January 7, 2015 at 11:04 AM

So . . .  you can’t explore bitcoins unless you actually have one in hand. If you don’t then, well, it’s really all pretty theoretical. We wanted to have some skin in the game, so to speak, so we decided we needed a bitcoin of our own.  For reasons that will become clear as we . . .
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Abolish West Point?

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Tuesday, January 6, 2015 at 2:50 PM

That’s the idea behind this article in Salon.  A different kind of lawfare, I guess.  Here’s the opening: Many pundits have suggested that the Republicans’ midterm gains were fueled by discontent not merely with the president or with the (improving) state of the economy, but with government in general and the need to fund its . . .
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The ICANN Transition of Internet Governance

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Tuesday, January 6, 2015 at 1:15 PM

I didn’t get a chance to post this over the weekend, but for those who are following the discussion over whether and how to transition control over the internet naming function to the international community, this editorial from the Washington Post suggests that there might be institutional caution growing.  Here is the opening: LAST MONTH, . . .
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The Interview — Ugh

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Friday, December 26, 2014 at 7:46 PM

Jane beat me to it …  This is a really bad movie.  The only thing worse than watching a bad movie out of a sense of patriotic obligation is doing so with the intent of writing a scathing review, only to find that most of your best analysis has already been written and published by . . .
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Christmas in the Trenches 2014

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Thursday, December 25, 2014 at 9:00 AM

This season makes me think of the story of the Christmas truce of 1914 in the trenches of the Western Front. With warm wishes to all of of Lawfare‘s readers and especial thanks to those of our readers who are serving overseas and are in harm’s way, here’s “Christmas in the Trenches,” by John McCutcheon:

Was It North Korea?

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Wednesday, December 24, 2014 at 12:44 PM

By now, we are all familiar with the attribution problems inherent in cyberspace.  Notwithstanding, I have been provisionally willing to accept the FBI’s assertion of North Korean responsibility for the Sony hack, if only because I assumed that it was premised on significant classified information to which we were not privy and that neither the . . .
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In the “No Hope” Category

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Tuesday, December 23, 2014 at 3:52 PM

You can put this lawsuit against Edward Snowden, Laura Poitras and others in the “no hope” category.  According to Tech Dirt: Horace B. Edwards, Navy veteran and former Secretary of Transportation for the state of Kansas, is suing Edward Snowden, Laura Poitras and a handful of “Hollywood Defendants” for profiteering from the distribution of “stolen . . .
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Safety At The Turn of the Last Century — A Satire

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Tuesday, December 23, 2014 at 3:06 PM

MEMORANDUM TO DIRECTOR, BUREAU OF FEDERAL TRANSPORTATION From:   BoFT Safety Inspectors Re:         Auto-mobile Issues Date:     Circa 1910 We write with concern regarding the safety of the newest transportation innovation the “auto-mobile.” As you know the auto-mobile is a novel technology that has yet to be fully tested by the government. We therefore think . . .
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North Korean Internet Down

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Monday, December 22, 2014 at 3:36 PM

The New York Times is reporting that the entire North Korean network is off line as of right now.  No information at all on the cause.  Here is the opening from the article: North Korea’s already tenuous links to the Internet went completely dark on Monday after days of instability, in what Internet monitors described . . .
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Sony Counter Attacks

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Thursday, December 11, 2014 at 11:32 AM

The reality of conflict (not war) in the cyber domain — Sony is now reported to be launching DDoS attacks against the hackers attempting to distribute its confidential documents: Sony has launched a counterattack against people trying to download leaked files stolen from its servers after a massive hack. Re/code is reporting that Sony is . . .
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Mysterious ’08 Turkey Pipeline Blast Opened New Cyberwar Era

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Wednesday, December 10, 2014 at 1:47 PM

Bloomberg has the story.  For those who think that cyber conflict is a bit of a myth, this is a cautionary tale.  From the opening: The pipeline was outfitted with sensors and cameras to monitor every step of its 1,099 miles from the Caspian Sea to the Mediterranean. The blast that blew it out of . . .
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Congress Tries To Stop the IANA Transition — But Does It?

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Wednesday, December 10, 2014 at 10:57 AM

By now, readers of this blog are aware of the decision by the Obama Administration to relinquish the last vestiges of control of the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (known as the IANA function).  The IANA function is currently operated by a non-profit corporation, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), under contract to . . .
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Lawfare Buys a Bitcoin — Introduction

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Tuesday, December 9, 2014 at 8:04 AM

Lawfare has decided to buy a bitcoin. We do this not as an investment but as an experiment in journalism. Buying a bitcoin will let us explore the mechanics of how the market works and also give us a fun platform to look at some of the legal and policy issues surrounding crypto-currency. This introductory . . .
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