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Posts by Jennifer Daskal

Jennifer Daskal joined American University Washington College of Law (WCL) in 2013 as an Assistant Professor of Law. She teaches and writes in the fields of criminal law, national security law, and constitutional law. From 2009-2011, Daskal was counsel to the Assistant Attorney General for National Security at the Department of Justice and, among other things, served on the Secretary of Defense and Attorney General-led Detention Policy Task Force. Prior to joining DOJ, she was the senior counterterrorism counsel at Human Rights Watch, worked as a staff attorney for the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia, and clerked for the Honorable Jed S. Rakoff. She spent two years before joining WCL’s faculty as a national security law fellow and adjunct professor at Georgetown Law Center.

Strikes in Syria: The International Law Framework

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Wednesday, September 24, 2014 at 2:25 AM

[Cross-posted at Just Security] As is now well-known, the United States last night hit approximately 25 targets inside Syria, some of which were directed at ISIL, and some at a group that has only recently been brought to the public’s attention – the Khorasan Group, which is reportedly comprised of al Qaeda militants and led by senior al Qaeda officials . . .
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Sunsetting the AUMF: Rep. Schiff’s Proposal

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Monday, June 10, 2013 at 12:54 PM

Pardon the interruption from all-things-surveillance, but pursuant to our back and forth with Bobby, Jack, Matt, and Ben on the merits of a new AUMF, Representative Adam Schiff, a senior member of the House Intelligence Committee, is planning to introduce legislation tomorrow that we think is worth taking a look at.  It sunsets a repeal of . . .
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Libya(?) and the Case for a New AUMF

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Wednesday, March 20, 2013 at 11:56 AM

While we appreciate Ben’s answer to our question (and share his view that we’re reaching the point of the conversation where everything has been said and everyone has said it), we still fail to understand how the Libya example illuminates what Ben—and Bobby, Jack, and Matt—think are the “problematic” aspects of an approach that requires . . .
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A Question for Ben

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Wednesday, March 20, 2013 at 10:18 AM

Ben writes that it is the “political reality” that “any president is going to feel obliged to maintain counterterrorism on offense,” i.e., counterterrorism through military means, “and Congress—whining, carping, complaining all the way both that the president is being too aggressive and that he is not being aggressive enough—will go along with it, indeed, will insist . . .
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After the AUMF, III: A Surreply to Jack

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Tuesday, March 19, 2013 at 12:28 AM

It’s quickly becoming apparent that we and Jack appear to be talking past each other on the merits of the Chesney/Goldsmith/Waxman/Wittes (CGWW) proposal for a new framework statute for “extra-AUMF threats.” In Jack’s final response, for example, he frames “the fundamental disagreement” between us and CGWW as the fact that we “believe that when the . . .
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After the AUMF, II: Daskal and Vladeck Reply

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Monday, March 18, 2013 at 7:16 PM

We appreciate Jack’s quick and comprehensive clarification of his views—and of what the CGWW proposal we critiqued last night seeks to achieve. Like Jack, we want to start by emphasizing the many areas of agreement between us and CGWW in order to help illuminate the key points of disagreement. (We’ve also had the benefit of . . .
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After the AUMF: A Response to Chesney, Goldsmith, Waxman, and Wittes

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Sunday, March 17, 2013 at 10:31 PM

In the very first days after the horrific attacks of September 11, 2001, the Bush Administration asked Congress for broad statutory authorization to use military force to “deter and pre-empt any future acts of terrorism or aggression against the United States”—that is to say, for statutory authorization of what that Administration called a “Global War . . .
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